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New Amsterdam Summer Sundays Hash House Harriers

Description

Founded by Paul Ashlin, Roy Gilbert & Joyce Saltalamachia on 27 Apr 97.

Schedule

Runs biweekly Sundays at 3:00 PM May to Oct only. We do not run in Manhattan, but run in the outskirts of NYC and in Northern New Jersey.

Receding Hareline (Next 60 Days)

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Date/Time Start / Transit Info Subway/LIRR/Metro North/Path Hare(s)

Mis-Management

Roy Dogface Gilbert (royg36 at aol.com)

Mis-Management (past)

Ewa Mobus (ewamobus1 at aol.com)

Cree Lawson (me at cree.net)

Chris Rust (christopherrust at optonline.net)

Rich K (RichK_hash at hotmail.com)


Latest NASSH3 Writeups

Run #15, May 17th 1998

Hash House Harriers, New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Writeup, May 17, 1998 New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Hash Run #15, May 17th 1998 Start: Metropolitan Ave, Queens, end of the M line. On In: Too thirsty to notice but right by the subway Hare: Geoff Baldwin Scribe: Roy Geoff comes from that school of thought that believes hashing should not be too simple. For example, why choose a start location that requires two trains to reach when you can choose one that takes three. At least it was good practice for the next end of the line run in Breezy Point. Eighteen of us managed to figure out how to get there. It took Jerome a bit longer to figure it out but he got there in the end. Apart from the usual assortment of hashers there was also a reporter and photographer from Fit magazine, whatever that is. Don¢t see the connection myself, especially when you look at the amount of time it took us to schlep ourselves round the trail. Beer Connoisseur magazine would have been more appropriate. Megan, the reporter, ran with us and the photographer kept appearing along the trail snapping away like mad. He also took numerous photos of arrows, checks and blobs of flour. In this part of Queens you have two options for the trail. You can either go along the expressway or through cemeteries. Geoff chose a cemetery for the start of the trail. I¢m sure watching us lot charging around yelling on on was very uplifting for the mourners. At least he had the decency to wait until we had left the...

New Amsterdam Summer Sunday H3 Run #14, May 3rd 1998

Hash House Harriers, New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Writeup, May 3, 1998 New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Hash Run #14, May 3rd 1998 Start: Staten Island Borough Hall. On In: Mills Court Hares: Joyce, Paul and Roy Scribe: Roy There are three days you want to avoid Staten Island when you are setting a hash -the NYC marathon, the Staten Island half and the five borough bike race. Bearing this in mind the three wise JMs opted for the day of the bike race. Yours truly had no problem getting to the start but my co hares who decided to drive there from their home five minutes from the ferry via the Verrazano bridge had to compete with 30,000 bikers. Fortunately I had a good book with me while I waited for them on the steps of Borough Hall. After setting the trail we found Basil and Mary fresh from the bikathon. They had tried to get in Mills Court for some liquid refreshment but found it jam packed with bikers so resorted to sunning themselves by Borough Hall. The 2.30 ferry arrived and disgorged over 20 hashers including two visitors, Larry and Mark, from Ithaca. Before sending them off into the wilds of Staten Island we assembled for the annual photo. The trail was an A to A. It was also an up and up. I still can¢t work out how a trail that starts and finishes at the same point can be 90% up hill, but up hill it certainly was. It also went through every bit of urban shiggy we could find as well as up (and once...

New Amsterdam Summer Sunday H3 Run #12, September 14, 1997

Hash House Harriers, New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Writeup, September 14, 1997 New Amsterdam Summer Sunday H3 Run #12, September 14, 1997 Hare: Curtis Fong Start: Borough Hall, Brooklyn. On On: Waterfront Tavern, Atlantic Ave. Scribe: Little John Glanville A modest crowd of about 15 hashers, mostly regulars, had already assembled at the start point by the time I arrived with Ariane and Petra. With typical European eccentricity, we’d managed to take three trains to get from the Upper West Side to Brooklyn before finding that we could have got there more easily, and on time, with one. European Monetary Union? We can’t even agree on that train to catch! Curtis explained the trail, including a strange new marking of ‘B5’ which was to mean a backcheck going back five marks. I’m always wary of hares who introduce new rules, especially when, like Curtis, they go on to suggest that they’ve been setting the run since Friday evening. We almost believed him. Off we went, fifteen energy-packed athletes, a perfect picture of youth and enthusiasm. That lasted all of twenty yards, by which time we’d failed to find the first mark, and slouched into a more apathetic mode for a few minutes while we sent Roy off to look for the trail. It was soon enough found, and the pack raced off once more, only to blindly blunder into a false trail. This was the start of a partial fragmentation, which split us up until a particularly difficult check in the park where people gathered at the top of the hill for a few moments before disappearing once again in...

NAS2H3, 20th July 1997

New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Hash Writeup, July 20, 1997 NAS2H3, 20th July 1997 Start: Willets Point / Shea Stadium On In: Some bar in the middle of nowhere Hare: Michael Hoffman Scribe: Roy Gilbert A beautiful day and a small group of hashers awaited the arrival of the hare, including DB2 deigning to attend the NASH Hash for the first time. *I*ve come to witness the demise of the NASH Hash* he announced. Oh how easy it is to confuse quantity and quality. How can you begin to compare the quality of the stalwart hashers who are willing to leave the confines of Manhattan with the hordes of twenty year olds that turn up, usually once only, on Wednesday evenings? Hare Michael eventually arrived. He*d had to call his sister for a lift because it had taken him so long to set the trail that it would have taken him ages to get back to the start by public transport. Ominous sign number one. *I need someone to sweep* proclaimed our hare. Ominous sign number two. Call me old fashioned but isn*t it the duty of the hare to sweep? Aren*t the rest of us meant to follow the trail? We suggested Alice as she normally occupies the sweeper*s position if not the role, but Geoff got the task instead. *It*s not that the checks are that difficult, and there are only two false trails, it*s just that it*s a long way to the first mark in some cases* Michael explained. Ominous sign number three. This by the way is the same Michael who, on a city run last...

NAS2H3 Run no. 2 11th May 1997

New Amsterdam Summer Sunday Hash Writeup, May 11, 1997 NAS2H3 Run no. 2 11th May 1997 Hare: Alice Harrison Start: Kew Gardens, Queens On In: O’Hanlons, 118-12 Queens Blvd, Queens Scribe: Roy Gilbert Well there we were at 3.10, eleven of us with nothing better to do on a warm Sunday afternoon than traipse out to Queens for a hash. Quite a cosmopolitan gathering, with the foreigners outnumbering the locals. Representatives from Ireland, Germany, Holland, Poland and England. Quite a polyglot lot too. Amongst other languages heard were English in a variety of accents, German, Russian and Ewaspeak. 3.15, still eleven of us and mounting concern as there was no sign of Alice, our hare for the afternoon. 3.20 we put our bags in Paul¢s car , still no Alice. And then in the distance the unmistakable hair of our hare. She hadn¢t forgotten us. Just stayed too late at Lesley¢s party the night before and had got out to Kew Gardens a bit late. She continued the well established NASS HASH tradition of supplying cookies (future hares please note). ¡I put plenty of marks at the beginning but they¢re a bit spaced out towards the end¢ Alice explained. ¡And I only had time to recce half of the trail¢ she continued. No worry we thought, we¢re all experienced hashers and off we went in a southerly direction. And true to her word the first part of the trail was well marked. The first three marks were reasonably easy to see and they were no more than 30 yards apart. It was after this that marks became very few...